Tuesday, 29 September 2020

Liam Blackwell from UKRI-EPSRC to speak at the Quantum Forum of our Autumn 2020 virtual conference

Let's Get Physical - Autumn 2020 Conference

Date: 12th - 16th October 2020
LocationVirtual 
Fees: none, you can register for as many days as you like
Registerhere! 
Find out more.

We are delighted to have Liam Blackwell from UKRI-EPSRC to speak at our Quantum Forum on Thursday 15th October, 2:10 PM.

Liam Blackwell is Deputy Director for Cross Council Programmes, with responsibility for the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council’s participation in the UK’s National Quantum Technologies Programme, its involvement in the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, and its contribution to Health and Healthcare. 

Prior to this he was Head of the Quantum Technologies Theme at EPSRC from 2015-2018.  From 2008 to 2017 Liam was the Head of the Information and Communications Technologies Theme at EPSRC, responsible for the EPSRC’s strategy for ICT research and training. 

Before joining the EPSRC in 2000, Liam Blackwell completed his PhD in material science at the University of Leeds and spent two years working at the technology centre of a Devon based clay mining company. At the EPSRC he has also worked in the Physics Programme team, Engineering Programme team and on delivery of the EPSRC's strategy for nanotechnology. Outside of work Liam is a keen hiker and skier.

Dr Richard Burguete, Director Postgraduate Institute for Measurement Science, to speak at our Autumn 2020 virtual conference

Let's Get Physical - Autumn 2020 Conference

Date: 12th - 16th October 2020
LocationVirtual 
Fees: none, you can register for as many days as you like
Registerhere! 
Find out more.

We are thrilled to have Dr Richard Burguete, Director Postgraduate Institute for Measurement Science, to give the opening keynote of our PGR Spotlight day on Wednesday, 14th October, 13:00

Richard graduated from the University of Sheffield with a PhD in Mechanical Engineering in 1994. Following three years as a postdoctoral researcher working in Experimental Mechanics, he joined the Experimental Stress Analysis group at Airbus in Bristol where he developed and implemented a variety of optical stress and deformation measurement techniques for structural testing. During this time, he sponsored many postgraduate research projects and led the development of the Structures Test R&D strategy for Airbus, as well as managing the associated trans-national test programme.

Having followed a postgraduate training pathway, Richard delivered technical solutions in his field of expertise, with a focus on the usual business challenges of optimising cost, time and quality. He understands the value of collaborative engagement well, and during his career at Airbus, alongside chairmanship of the British Society for Strain Measurement, he fostered the development of stronger links between industry, academia and related technical societies – he is a strong believer in the industrial application of high-level academic research and skills.

As Director of the PGI, Richard continues to fulfil his passion for industry and academic collaboration. It is an ideal platform for postgraduate training, leading to the development of extremely desirable skills and capabilities that the benefit industry and academia alike, but most importantly, because they enhance the career prospects for postgraduate researchers.

You can read all about the first five years of the PGI here 

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Tuesday, 22 September 2020

Prof Jesse Thaler, MIT, is giving the final keynote of our Autumn 2020 conference

Let's Get Physical - Autumn 2020 Conference

Date: 12th - 16th October 2020
LocationVirtual 

Fees: none, you can register for as many days as you like
Registerhere! 
Find out more.

We are absolutely delighted to welcome Prof Jesse Thaler,  MIT, as keynote speaker on our last day of the conference during the Data Science &AI session. He will be speaking on Friday 16th October at 13:00 

Prof Jesse Thaler is the inaugural Director of the NSF AI Institute for Artificial Intelligence and Fundamental Interactions.  He is a theoretical particle physicist who fuses techniques from quantum field theory and machine learning to address outstanding questions in fundamental physics.  His current research is focused on maximizing the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through new theoretical frameworks and novel data analysis techniques.  

Prof. Thaler is an expert in jets, which are collimated sprays of particles that are copiously produced at the LHC, and he studies the substructure of jets to enhance the search for new phenomena and illuminate the dynamics of gauge theories.  He is also interested in new strategies to probe the nature of dark matter at the LHC and beyond. 

Prof. Thaler joined the MIT Physics Department in 2010, and is currently an Associate Professor in the Center for Theoretical Physics. From 2006 to 2009, he was a fellow at the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University in 2006, and his Sc.B. in Math/Physics from Brown University in 2002. He was awarded an Early Career Research Award from the U.S. Department of Energy in 2011, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from the White House in 2012, a Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 2013, and a Harold E. Edgerton Faculty Achievement Award from MIT in 2016.

Fun Fact 

As an undergraduate, Jesse Thaler was a late-night jazz radio DJ on 95.5 WBRU, using the radio name ""Lester"" after the legendary tenor saxophonist Lester Young.

Prof Tim Spiller, University of York to speak at the Quantum forum of our Autumn 2020 virtual conference

Let's Get Physical - Autumn 2020 Conference

Date: 12th - 16th October 2020
LocationVirtual 

Fees: none, you can register for as many days as you like
Registerhere! 
Find out more.

We are delighted to have Prof Tim Spiller, University of York attending our Quantum forum discussion. The forum will take place on Thursday 15th October at 14:10  

Professor Tim Spiller moved to York in 2014 as founding Director of the York Centre for Quantum Technologies and he is now also Director of the UK Quantum Communications Hub. 

Prior to this he was at the University of Leeds in the roles of Head of the Quantum Information Group and Director of Research for the School of Physics and Astronomy.  Prior to 2009 Spiller was Director of Quantum Information Processing (QIP) Research at HP Labs Bristol – an activity that he established in 1995 – and a Hewlett-Packard Distinguished Scientist. 

He has spent 40 years researching quantum theory, superconducting systems and quantum hardware and technologies. He led HP’s strategy on the commercialisation of QIP research, is an inventor on 25 patents linked to quantum technologies and applications, and was additionally a consultant inside HP on networking, communications and nanotechnology.


Liam Bussey, BT, to speak at the forum of our Autumn 2020 virtual conference

Let's Get Physical - Autumn 2020 Conference

Date: 12th - 16th October 2020
LocationVirtual 

Fees: none, you can register for as many days as you like
Registerhere! 
Find out more.

We are delighted to welcome Liam Bussey, BT, to the forum of our Quantum session. The forum discussion will take place on  Thursday 15th October at 14:10 

Liam Bussey graduated in 2018 with a Masters Degree in Physics from the University of Kent. He is working as research professional with the Network Physics team of  BT's Applied Research division.  He is looking at introducing quantum technologies to the communication industry.

Marco Menchetti, BT Quantum Research Specialist to speak at our Autumn 2020 virtual conference

Let's Get Physical - Autumn 2020 Conference

Date: 12th - 16th October 2020
LocationVirtual 

Fees: none, you can register for as many days as you like
Registerhere! 
Find out more.

We are very much looking forward to the presentation from Marco Menchetti, BT as industry speaker for our Quantum session. He will be speaking on Thursday 15th October at 13:10 

Marco joined BT in 2018, after finishing his PhD in cold atoms physics at Birmingham University with a thesis titled "Experimental set-up for realising long-range interaction using strontium atoms in an optical lattice". During his studies, he worked at NPL in London and the LENS in Florence.

At the moment he's working as a research specialist with the optical networks team. His research focus is  QKD and optical clock with the IqClock project.

He first visited England in 2008 when he worked as a pizzaiolo in London for the summer season.

Synopsis

Atomic Clocks: The most precise instruments in the world.

If someone had started two atomic clocks during the Big Bang, those clocks wold now agree within about 2 seconds. Atomic clocks are so precise that they can measure the difference in the speed of time between your feet and your head. They do that by cooling a gas to a temperature of few micro kelvins (this is 0.000001 K above the absolute zero) and trapping the atom of the gas in an optical lattice generated by powerful lasers. Those atoms are then used as a reference to calibrate the clock.

Atomic clocks are starting now exiting the labs and now the question is: what can we do with such powerful instrument?



Prof Kai Bongs, University of Birmingham to speak at our Autumn 2020 virtual conference

Let's Get Physical - Autumn 2020 Conference

Date: 12th - 16th October 2020
LocationVirtual 

Fees: none, you can register for as many days as you like
Registerhere! 
Find out more.

We are delighted to have Prof Kai Bongs from the University of Birmingham as speaker for our Quantum session. He will be speaking on Thursday 15th October at 13:50 AM Please join Prof Bongs as well for the forum discussion at 14:10.

"Professor Kai Bongs is Principle Investigator at the UK National Quantum Technology Hub Sensors and Timing, where he helps to drive the translation of quantum science into technology and applications across a diverse number of sectors, including climate, communications, energy, transport and urban development. Professor Bongs is also Director of Innovation at the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences at the University of Birmingham and leads the Midlands Ultracold Atom Research Centre at the University of Birmingham. 

Professor Bongs contributed to the Quantum Technologies: Blackett review, a Government report published in 2016, which explored how the UK could benefit from the research, development, and commercialisation of quantum technologies. He has built extensive links with key industry partners, working with over 40 companies in over 30 projects. 

Professor Bongs received the Josiah Mason award for Business Advancement in 2017 and the Denis Gabor Medal form the Institute of Physics in 2019, in recognition of his leadership of translation of Quantum Technology to industry. Professor Bongs is Editor-in-Chief for the European Physical Journal (Quantum Technologies). He is also a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Fellow, as well as a Fellow of the Institute of Physics and the Institution of Engineering and Technology."

Synopsis

We need great minds developing the ideas with which quantum sensors will shape our future. Whenever we learn to sense something we could not sense before, we might be on the verge of changing the world. One recent example is the CCD sensor, invented in 1969 and awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2009. This sensor has been pivotal to the social media revolution, enabling every person to take photos and videos with their phone  wherever they are and send then around the world. Quantum sensors and clocks promise a whole range of new capabilities, from looking into the ground to interfacing with the brain. I will introduce some basic quantum sensor concepts, highlight ground-breaking capabilities and am looking forward to discussing your application ideas.